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ASE Challenge Resources

 

  • guide
  • Grades 6+
  • 1-4 hours
  • 4

ASE Challenge Experiment Resources

Before you get started in developing your idea for the ASE AstroSat Challenge, here are some tips and tricks to help you along the way. If you have any questions please contact info@ardusat.com.

There are a lot of great learning resources available at http://www.ardusat.com/lessons to help you get familiar with space concepts and the sensors that you can use to run your experiment. Outlined below are materials we recommend that you review. It is not required that you use the Ardusat Space Kit, however, it could be useful to get familiar with the sensors that are on the Satellites.

The Satellite
The satellite you will use, called Lemur, is orbiting the Earth about 220 miles up, and it goes around Earth every ninety minutes. It is in a "Low Earth Orbit" or LEO. It passes through daylight and night every orbit. For your experiment you can command the satellite to take measurements with any of the following sensors onboard.

Temperature Sensor

  • The temperature sensor is pointed toward Earth.
  • It can see everything within a 180 degree hemisphere from its surface.
  • It can measure temperatures between -45C (-50F) and +125C (+260F).
  • Experiment Ideas: what is the temperature out in space? What is the temperature change based on the surface temperature on Earth? How much does sunlight affect the temperature of the satellite?
  • For more information about the sensor check out the temperature sensor guide.

Infrared Thermometer

  • The infrared thermometer is pointed toward Earth.
  • It measures temperature by evaluating the amount of infrared light it sees.
  • The sensor sees everything within a 90-degree cone that spreads out from its tip.
  • It can measure temperatures between -70C (-95F) and +380C (715F).
  • Experiment Ideas: How does the average surface temperature of the Earth change over water, ice, or a volcano?
  • For more information about the sensor check out the Infrared sensor guide.

UV Sensor

  • The UV sensor is pointed toward Earth.
  • It measures ultraviolet light – light so violet that it cannot be seen by the naked eye.
  • It can see everything within a 180 degree hemisphere from its surface.
  • Experiment ideas: How does UV readings from a satellite in LEO compare with UV readings on Earth? What kind of UV readings does a satellite give you when the satellite is in the Earth's shadow?
  • For more information about the sensor check out the UV sensor guide.

Luminosity Sensor

  • The luminosity sensor is pointed toward Earth.
  • It measures both visible and infrared light.
  • It can see everything within a 180 degree hemisphere from its surface.
  • Unlike the photoresistor, it adds up the amount of light it sees over the time period you tell it to.
  • Experiment ideas: how close does changes in brightness (luminosity) match up with changes in temperture? Is there a relationship between luminosity and high levels of UV radiation?
  • For more information about the sensor check out the Luminosity sensor guide.

IMU- Accelerometer, Gyroscope, Magnetometer, Barometer

  • All of the sensors are facing towards the Earth, but the sensors on the IMU (which stands for Innertial Measurement Unit) is not measuring sensors on Earth. These sensors are typically used on a satellite to maintain direction.
  • The Accelerometer measures acceleration in the X, Y, and Z axis.
  • The Gyroscope measures spin and rotation on the X, Y, and Z axis.
  • The barometer measures barometric pressure. How much pressure is there going to be outside the atmosphere?
  • Magnetometer measures magnetic field strength in the X, Y, and Z axis. This could be used for getting magnetic readings of the earths magnetic field.
  • Experiment Ideas: measure the magnetic field reading of multiple locations on Earth.
  • For more information about the IMU check out our IMU Sensor Guide

Optional part 1: Complete the Getting Started in Less than 60 Minutes Guide**. The Getting Started guide will teach you how to:

  • Wire a sensor to an Arduino
  • Upload Ardusat Code to an Arduino
  • Connect to the Ardusat Experiment Platform

Optional part 2: build some on-Earth experiments to learn how it works on Earth.

Additional Resources:

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Experiment ‘Data Payload’ is the sensor data you collect on the Satellite:

  • There is a maximum experiment data payload size of 10kb (or more, check for updates) that you will design your experiment around.
  • An example 10kb payload would be about 1,250 temperature sensor readings.
  • Experiment data is appended to data payload on the satellite and is scheduled for download once the experiment data collection ends or data limit is met.

How to setup Sensor Data Collection:

Here are the configuration parameters that can be used to build your data collection.

  • Schedule: Date and/or Time
  • Location: Latitude / Longitude
  • Sensor(s)
  • Frequency of measurement
  • Filtering (min, max, min+max)

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